This is a donat­ed post as part of a Blog­gin’ Mamas Social Good cam­paign. All opin­ions expressed are our own.

We have been strong advo­cates for mak­ing sure your kids are prop­er­ly restrained in your car, to keep them safe. This doesn’t include just mak­ing sure they are in a car seat or boost­er. This also means, mak­ing sure they have a seat­belt on and are sit­ting in the back seat.

Every 33 sec­onds a child under 13 is involved in a car crash in the Unit­ed States. For younger chil­dren, car seats can dra­mat­i­cal­ly reduce the risk of fatal­i­ty or injury – but over half of car seats are either installed or used incor­rect­ly. For old­er chil­dren, buck­ling up is crit­i­cal. A full 50% of chil­dren age 8–14 who were killed in car crash­es from 2011–2015 were not restrained.

That’s why we want par­ents and care­givers to know about the impor­tance of mak­ing sure their child is safe­ly restrained—whether that’s select­ing the right car seat for their child’s age and size, or mak­ing sure that old­er kids (8–14) always buck­le their seat belts and sit in the back­seat.

As par­ents, we all want to do the right thing to keep our chil­dren safe and sound.  This spring, the Ad Coun­cil and the U.S. Depart­ment of Transportation’s Nation­al High­way Traf­fic Safe­ty Admin­is­tra­tion (NHTSA) are unveil­ing new PSAs to address the­se impor­tant issues.  First, is the up to date car seat safe­ty infor­ma­tion like the tips found in the fun new video series “The Wide World of Car Seats.”

If you have ever installed a car seat, you know that it is not an easy task to mas­ter. Wouldn’t it be cool if we were cheered on for our par­ent­ing wins, like how we cheer on our own kids in sports? 

The right car seat can make all the dif­fer­ence in a motor vehi­cle crash. And car crash­es are a lead­ing cause of death for chil­dren 1 to 13 years old.  But despite their best inten­tions, many par­ents may not real­ize their child isn’t in the right seat.  For exam­ple, many par­ents move their chil­dren to the next restraint type (car seat, boost­er seat, seat belt) too soon. To make sure you have the right seat for your child, vis­it SaferCar.gov/TheRightSeat.

And just when you think you’ve got this par­ent­ing thing down, your child becomes a “tween” and you enter a whole new world.  To help with trav­el safe­ty, the Ad Coun­cil and the U.S. Depart­ment of Transportation’s Nation­al High­way Traf­fic Safe­ty Admin­is­tra­tion (NHTSA) are unveil­ing new PSAs fea­tur­ing char­ac­ters from Fox’s upcom­ing sum­mer road trip adven­ture Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul. The PSAs remind par­ents and care­givers that even if kids argue and plead, par­ents should stand firm and always insist that their kids buck­le up and sit in the back seat (the safest place for kids under the age of 13).

Do your kids like the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series as much as mine? Now you can even watch PSAs with them fea­tur­ing their favorite char­ac­ters, show­ing them the impor­tance of buck­ling up and sit­ting in the back seat.  


Per data from the U.S. Depart­ment of Transportation’s Nation­al High­way Traf­fic Safe­ty Admin­is­tra­tion (NHTSA), an esti­mat­ed 69,000 tweens are injured every year in car crash­es and 61% of 14-year-old chil­dren killed in 2015 car crash­es were unre­strained at the time of the crash.  Even though life as a par­ent is full of com­pro­mis­es, seat belt safe­ty should nev­er be up for nego­ti­a­tion. That’s why the new PSAs encour­age us to: “Nev­er give up until they buck­le up!”

For more infor­ma­tion or if you need more tips to con­vince your tween to buck­le up, vis­it SaferCar.gov/KidsBuckleUp.  If you have a great tip, join the con­ver­sa­tion on social media using: #Kids­Buck­le­Up.